Adirondack Association of Towns & Villages

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AATV

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

 

The purpose of the Adirondack Association of Towns and Villages, is to act as

a representative of the Towns and Villages of the Adirondacks in addressing

issues unique to Local Government and residents within the Adirondack Park. 

The organization shall develop a consensus on the resolution of Adirondack issues.


News:
Adirondack Region College Graduates Want To Stay in Region and Start Businesses
July 03, 2015

Adirondack Region College Graduates

Want To Stay in Region and Start Businesses

------------------------

Survey Finds Reasons for Optimism as Region

Embarks on Strategy to Inspire Entrepreneurialism

MAYFIELD Nearly 70% of this year’s graduates from Adirondack Region colleges

considered looking for a job in the region and many would consider starting a business in

the Adirondacks — clear indications that young people are interested in making their

homes in the area if the right career and business opportunities exist.

These are among the reasons for Adirondack optimism found in an informal survey of

more than 300 graduating students commissioned by the Adirondack Association of

Towns & Villages in partnership with public relations firm Behan Communications, Inc.

The survey was commissioned by AATV to gain insight into how the Adirondack Region

is perceived as a place to live and build a career in the eyes of the next generation of

business and community leaders. Participating colleges were Clarkson University, North

Country Community College, Paul Smith’s College, St. Lawrence University, SUNY

Adirondack, SUNY Plattsburgh and SUNY Potsdam.

The survey findings reinforce the wisdom of the ADVANTAGE Adirondacks economic

development strategy unveiled late last year by the Adirondack Partnership, a coalition of

local governments, nonprofits, business organizations, colleges and universities, and

other Adirondack region organizations, including AATV. This strategy puts a premium

on: inspiring entrepreneurship among people who crave the healthy lifestyle available in

the region; cultivating sustainable land-based businesses; and improving the region’s

connectivity through improved internet and cell phone access, helping Adirondack

entrepreneurs do business anywhere in the world.

 

 

“Students who choose to go to college in the Adirondack Region are prime candidates to

 

remain or become year-round residents and business leaders,” said AATV President

 

Brian Towers, supervisor of the town of Wells in Hamilton County. “They love the

 

Adirondacks’ natural beauty, tremendous recreational amenities and small, safe

 

communities, and most of them plan to live in a rural area. They want to live here, and

 

 

there is a real opportunity for local governments and organizations across the region to

 

work with them to help them realize their dreams.”

 

“So much of what we heard from the students told us, without question, that we are on

 

the right track with the ADVANTAGE Adirondacks strategy,” said Bill Farber, chairman

 

of the Hamilton County Board of Supervisors and immediate past president of AATV.

 

“The key to building a self-sustaining Adirondack economy is transforming our

 

advantages into opportunity through entrepreneurism, education, improved broadband

 

and cell phone coverage, and sustainable use of our tremendous natural resources for

 

tourism and a reinvention of traditional Adirondack industries.”

 

Among the highlights of the survey:

 

• 68% of graduating students said they considered looking for a job in the Adirondack

 

Region. This included 82% of the students who lived year-round in the Adirondack

 

Region prior to graduation, and 60% of the students who lived elsewhere on a year-round

 

basis.

 

• Students are more inclined to start their own business within the Adirondack Region

 

(34%) than outside the region (30%). Of those students who lived year-round in the

 

region prior to graduation, 44% would consider starting a business in the region; 28% of

the students who lived elsewhere would consider starting an Adirondack business.


• 53% of students said they would prefer to live in a rural setting, as compared to 37%


who prefer the suburbs and 10% who prefer a big city.


• Asked to name the top three things they like about the Adirondacks, 93% of the students


said the natural beauty and open space; 68% said outdoor recreational opportunities; and


48% said small, safe communities.


• Asked to name up to three things Adirondack communities must improve in order to


retain and attract more young people to live there year-round, 87% chose good-paying


jobs; 46% chose more year-round cultural, social and entertainment options; and 41

 

chose improved internet and cellular coverage.

“The students are spot-on that good-paying jobs are central to a sustainable Adirondack


economy and sustainable Adirondack communities,” said AATV President Towers.


“AATV is committed to working with The Adirondack Partnership to create these jobs


through a reinvention and reinvigoration of traditional land-land-based Adirondack


industries and by providing opportunities and encouragement for young entrepreneurs to


create jobs for themselves and others.”


Entrepreneurism is already taking root in many corners of the region. Take Matt and


Laura O’Brien, for example. After working in the ski industry across the country, the


young couple brought their love of the sport — and love of a challenge — to the Town of


Speculator in Hamilton County where they purchased the formerly town-owned Oak


Mountain ski center and turned it into a year-round attraction with skiing, mountain


biking, fine dining and wedding and festival venues. “The Adirondacks are a perfect


place for us to realize our dream of running our own business and raising our family in a


safe and beautiful setting,” Laura said. “We love the opportunity to grow this business


and provide jobs to other young people so they can pursue their dreams.”


A couple of hours northeast, in the Clinton County town of Saranac, another young


couple is building a successful future for their growing family on a pasture-based


sustainable family farm. “We were originally looking at Vermont, but were drawn to the


Adirondack Region because the price of land was about one-third the cost,” said Sarah


Vaillancourt, who along with her husband, Josh, own Woven Meadows Farm, a purveyor


of dairy products and meats that will soon expand into cheese making. “Now we can’t


imagine doing this anywhere else. The Adirondacks are so authentic and welcoming. Our


business is growing. There are more opportunities here than we ever imagined.”


“The days of the ‘woe is me’ attitude are over when it comes to the Adirondack


economy,” said Hamilton County Board of Supervisors Chairman Farber. “The key


words now are ‘Advantages’ and ‘Opportunities,’ and we see plenty of both reflected in


the thoughts and feelings of the college students who will become our community and


business leaders of tomorrow.”


AATV surveyed 336 associates, bachelor’s and graduate degree candidates via an online


survey tool in May 2015 in cooperation with Adirondack Region colleges and


universities. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 6% and is intended only to


provide a reasonable indication of the views of Adirondack Region college graduates.


Summary of AATV Survey of Graduates

 

from Adirondack Region Colleges and Universities

 

 

 

• 68% of graduating students said they considered looking for a job in the Adirondack

 

Region. This included 82% of the students who lived year-round in the Adirondack

 

Region prior to graduation, and 60% of the students who lived elsewhere on a year-round

 

basis.

 

• Students are more inclined to start their own business within the Adirondack Region

 

(34%) than outside the region (30%). Of those students who lived year-round in the

 

region prior to graduation, 44% would consider starting a business in the region; 28% of

 

the students who lived elsewhere would consider starting an Adirondack business.

 

• 53% of students said they would prefer to live in a rural setting, as compared to 37%

 

who prefer the suburbs and 10% who prefer a big city.

 

• Asked to name the top three things they like about the Adirondacks, 93% of the students

 

said the natural beauty and open space; 68% said outdoor recreational opportunities; and

 

48% said small, safe communities.

 

• Asked to name up to three things Adirondack communities must improve in order to

 

retain and attract more young people to live there year-round, 87% chose good-paying

 

jobs; 46% chose more year-round cultural, social and entertainment options; and 41%

 

chose improved internet and cellular coverage.

 

• 45% of those students who lived in the Adirondack Region on a full-time basis prior to

 

graduation said they planned to continue living and working there. 34% said they plan to

 

live and work elsewhere; 23% were undecided. Of those students who lived outside the

 

Adirondack Region on a year-round basis, 8% planned to stay in the region after

 

graduation; 70 planned to live elsewhere; 22% were undecided.

 

• 27% of students said they believed they could find a good-paying job in the region.

 

73% of students said there are few, if any, good-paying jobs in the Adirondacks.

 

• Overall, students were fairly evenly split over whether Adirondack communities’

 

greatest focus should be bringing in more businesses (37%), protecting the environment

 

and open space (33%) or improving cultural and entertainment options (31%). A

 

difference of opinion is found between those students who lived in the Adirondack

 

Region year-round prior to graduation and those who lived elsewhere. 46% of year-round

 

residents put the priority on more businesses, followed by more cultural and

 

entertainment options (29%) and environmental and open space protection (25%). Of the

 

non-residents, 37% put the priority on environmental and open space protection; 32% on

 

more cultural and entertainment options; and 31% on more businesses.

 

 

 


DEC News
May 13, 2015

DEC Website Can Help Promote Adirondack Communities

 

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) website (www.dec.ny.gov) has a number of features to promote outdoor recreational activities in your community and more is on the way.

 

Adirondack Forest Preserve and Easement Land Web Pages

An effort is underway to develop web pages for all forest preserve units in the Adirondacks and all conservation easement tracts with public access.

 

The web pages will contain general information about the unit, contact information for obtaining more information, updated downloadable maps and specific information on all recreational facilities within the unit including: trails, trailheads, boat launches, designated campsites, lean-tos, boat launches, hand launches, fire towers, ADA compliant accessible features, parking areas, bathrooms, places to fish, hunt & trap, and more.

 

Links to regional and local tourism organization web sites will also be present on each web page. Also nearby communities and the amenities such as gas, dining, lodging, food & supplies available there will also be listed.

 

DEC plans to create or update all of more than 70 web pages by early summer. Some have already been completed, take a look and see what you think:

·       Giant Mountain Wilderness (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/100750.html)

·       Hoffman Notch Wilderness (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/81598.html)

·       Jay Mountain Wilderness (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/98307.html)

·       Split Rock Wild Forest (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/50713.html)

·       St Regis Canoe Area (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/70572.html)

·       Wilmington Wild Forest (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/88755.html)

·       William C. Whitney & Round Lake Wildernesses (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/9165.html)

·       Fulton Chain Wild Forest (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/75305.html)

·       Ha-De-Ron-Dah Wilderness (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/91261.html)

·       Paul Smiths College Conservation Easement (http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/70561.html)

 

More web pages will appear on the web site each week. DEC encourages communities to link to the web pages of the nearby forest preserve unit or conservation easement tract. They also request that you check to be sure a link to your local tourism organization is included and the list of communities and the amenities are correct. Comments may be sent to Info.R5@dec.ny.gov

 

 

Adirondack Trail Information Web Pages

DEC maintains six Adirondack Trail Information (www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7865.html) web pages that provide information on trails and other backcountry features. DEC updates the web pages weekly with information provided by DEC Foresters and Forest Rangers.

 

The web pages provide general information and seasonal conditions; specific notices on closures and other situations involving trails, roads, foot bridges, parking lots, etc.; and links to rules & regulations, hiker and camper safety, low impact recreation, forest ranger contact information, weather and more.

 

DEC encourages communities to link to the web page with the information for their area or use the information on the web pages to information visitors and residents of your community of backcountry conditions.

 

Currently the Adirondack Trail Information web pages only cover DEC Region 5 but DEC plans to expand to include all of the Adirondacks in the near future.

 

 

Where to Fish in the Adirondacks

Fishing is one of the most popular outdoor recreation activities in the Adirondacks. DEC website has lots of information about fishing (www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/fishing.html).

 

Some of the pages that will help promote your community can be found on the Adirondack/Lake Champlain Fishing web page (www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/28244.html) and the North Central NY Fishing web page (www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/47504.html).

 

Use the links on these web pages to get information on where the fish are, including lists by county of the all the waters containing brook trout and the best waters for catching other game fish species.

 

Again DEC encourages communities to use the web pages to inform resident and visiting anglers of where they can go fishing nearby.

 

Explore the DEC web site using their search engine to obtain more information. If you don’t find what you are looking for contact DEC Region 5 at Info.R5@dec.ny.gov or DEC Region 6 at information.r6@dec.ny.gov.

 

Association of Towns Conference
February 25, 2015

The AATV attended the annual meeting and training session of the Association of Towns.  The AATV supported two sessions involving adirondack topics titled "Planning for Success:  A Small Town's Marketing and Branding Initiative and its Pay-Off:  Tourism Attraction and Placemaking" which spoke about the Town of Newcomb's efforts to increase awareness of their community and "Why Human Diversity Matter:  How a Sustainable Future for the Adirondacks is more than a Black and White Issue" which was presented by SUNY-ESF's Northern Forest Institute and NYSDEC.

 

The AATV vendor booth was busy meeting new friends and welcoming old friends that stopped in.  A raffle for two hand crafted moose was won by Kelly Smith, Town Boardmember from Groton, New York.  A reception was held on Sunday evening at the AATV suite to honor George Canon for his over 23 years of hard work and dedication to the organization.  Gerry Geist from the Association of Towns, Brian Towers from AATV and Randy Douglas from Essex County, NY all spoke and honored Mr. Canon, thanking him for his numerous accomplishments over the years.

 

This was the last year for the AOT meeting/training session to be held at the Hilton and Sheraton hotels as they will be moving to the Marriot on 45th Street for the 2016 event.  The Sheraton Hotel has been our "home" for the AATV hospitality suite for many years and we would like to thank them for their great service and accomodations.  We will miss their hospitality but look forward to the change.

 

Our next event is Local Government Days in Lake Placid on April 15 & 16, 2015.  For information about attending or a vendor booth for the event, please contact AATV at aatv@aatvny.org 

 

 

 

 
APP
APP
Screenshot of the Discover the Adirondack Park APP available on IOS and Androis for free.
NEW YORK STATE
New York State with outline of Adirondack Park
 

The Adirondack Park consists of over six million acres which is located in the northeastern corner of New York State.  The Adirondack Park is the largest park in the 48 contiguous states and Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Glacier National Park would all fit into it with room to spare. There are 102 Towns and Villages located within the Adirondack Park.

 
 
 

Feel free to submit an email to aatv@aatvny.org with any suggestions or thoughts you would like to see on our site.


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